THE TECHNACIOUS RECRUITER NEWSLETTER

November 1, 2007   view past issues

Our newsletter is
brought to you by





Feature: Lights, Camera, Action

There’s been a lot of discussion recently about the emergence of video resumes. Will they catch on? Are they helpful or hurtful to candidates? To employers? Do video resumes take online recruiting and job search to the next level-the vaunted Web 2.0-or are they simply yet another Internet fad that will fade away when the marketing dollars run out and the media moves on?

All of those questions are important, I suppose, but I think they detract us from the larger issue. What’s that? How can video be used in recruiting? Certainly, crafting personal resumes is one way, but it’s by no means the only option. In fact, I think there’s a far more powerful way to deploy visual images and sound in the War for the Best Talent online. I believe video is the key to a whole new genre of employee testimonials.

Employee testimonials have long been recognized as a key recruitment communication and marketing tool. The best talent are good consumers. They don’t take organizational claims about employment brands at face value. They look for proof. And, some of the most persuasive proof is the testimony of their peers. In employment collateral and in the Career area on corporate sites, what employees have to say-as long as it’s not sugar-coated or lackey-like-more effectively shapes candidate perspectives about an employer than any other single factor.

Traditionally, employee testimonials have been presented as text statements often accompanied by a picture of the individual. Done well, they provide a window into the organization that ratifies its claims about what it’s like to work there. They put a human face on the organization which makes it easier for a candidate to relate to the employer and, no less important, to those who will be their peers.

Text-based testimonials clearly get the job done, but I think testimonials presented in a video format could have an even more powerful impact. Now, just to be clear, I’m not talking about marketing videos that introduce the organization. These have been around for several years and are increasingly common on corporate Web-sites. There’s nothing wrong with them, but they are not employee testimonials. They may include an employee statement or two, but they are basically about the organization.

Video-based employee testimonials, on the other hand, are about the people who work for an organization. They use visual images and audio to tell a story-their story-about what it’s like to work for their employer. They will sell the organization, but only if they are engaging and credibly describe (or suggest) the nature of the individual’s employment experience.

Two recent examples will illustrate my point. They are imperfect, but still intriguing. Both were created without “corporate involvement.” In fact, they are nothing more than lip synching coupled with some group pantomiming and crude sets. However, each in its own way says something that is especially engaging about the culture of an employer and the pride felt by its employees for the work that they do.

  • You’ll find the first testimonial here. (For those who are squeamish about lyrics, please be warned.) It was created by a group of employees in a single take one day after work. Without so much as a marketing phrase or formal endorsement, it makes a bold statement about the employment experience the company offers. Does the video work? It was posted on a video sharing site and quickly became one of its most popular (i.e., viewed) shows. Here’s what some of the viewers wrote in response (with a little editing from me): “I would rather work there over any other job.” “Would even move to another country to get a job with people like you guys …” “O.K., two questions: Where do you people work? Can I have a job?”
  • The second testimonial is posted here. It was created by an intern at Yahoo! who simply wanted to tell his friends about where he worked and what he did. He rewrote the lyrics to a popular rap, rolled some video and posted the result on a video sharing site. It doesn’t earn universal acclaim, but 16 viewers gave it a heart, indicating they love it.
  • What can we learn from these first generation video testimonials? I think the following are the key lessons:

  • Video testimonials work best when they are positioned to be viral. That means they should be posted on video sharing sites as well as in the Career area on corporate Web-sites.
  • Much more than their text-based counterparts, video testimonials depend upon authenticity. They should not be staged corporate productions, but rather individual (or group) creations that express the essence of an organization’s employment experience.
  • A video testimonial is not simply a film of a text-based message. Rather, it is a visual presentation that draws on sound and motion as well as images to deliver a persuasive and memorable confirmation of an organization’s employment brand.
  • Thanks for reading,

    Peter

    P.S. Remember what you learned in kindergarten: It’s nice to share. Don’t keep WEDDLE’s to yourself. If you like our newsletter, please tell your friends and colleagues about it. They’ll appreciate your thinking of them. And, we will too!

    P.S.S. Don’t forget to send us your new e-mail address if you move. Lots of people are changing jobs these days, and we want to be sure you still have the information in WEDDLE’s to help you perform at your peak. All you have to do to keep your WEDDLE’s newsletter coming is send your change of address to pwj@weddles.com.


    This Issue’s Sponsor: WEDDLE’s 2007 Fall/Winter Training Series

    This issue of WEDDLE’s newsletter is brought to you through the generous support of the WEDDLE’s 2007 Fall/Winter Training Series.

    This series is a full curriculum of training programs that are delivered by toll-free teleconference. You get the PowerPoint slides for each program in advance, and on the day of the training, you simply call a toll-free number and have the presentation delivered right to you. All of the programs are presented by WEDDLE’s Publisher, Peter Weddle, and draw on WEDDLE’s 10+ years of research into the Best Practices for sourcing and recruiting online. The Fall/Winter 2007 series is sponsored by Bernard Hodes Group; the remaining programs include:

  • November 6, 2007: Googling, Blogging & Other Sourcing Techniques for Passive Prospects
  • November 27, 2007: Blink Recruiting-Getting to “Yes” Fast With Passive Prospects
  • December 4, 2007: Building a Corporate Career Site for Top Talent
  • December 18, 2007: A-to-Z in Best Practices for Online Recruitment Advertising
  • These are great learning opportunities and priced hundreds, even thousands of dollars less than other training programs. Registrations are limited, so reserve your seats now. To get pricing information and sign up, please call WEDDLE’s at 317.598.9768.


    Section Two: Site News You Can Use

    Harvard Business Review published an artitle entitled Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time by Tony Schwartz. His hypothesis is interesting: instead of managing our time, which is a limited or finite resource, we should focus on managing our energy as it has much greater capacity and can be increased relatively easily. How? By practicing simple rituals that will make the expansion of one’s energy unconscious and as automatic as possible. For example, while we often don’t recognize them, our lives are governed by “Ultradian rhythms” which unfold in 90-to-120 minute cycles. Generally speaking, that means we reach our peak level of performance at any given task-whether it’s conducting interviews or sourcing online-after about 60 minutes so we should time ourselves to achieve an outcome at that point and then take a break to renew our energy within the next 30 minutes. If we organize our work that way, Schwartz argues, we’ll avoid finding ourselves running out of steam at the end of overly long sessions or quitting a task before we’ve achieved our optimum results. Can this approach actually improve performance? In a study of employees at Wachovia Bank, those who used such rhythmic schedules had 43% higher loan revenues and 50% higher deposit revenues than those in a control group which operated in a less structured way. I’m not sure all work can be organized into such monolithic chunks of time, but certainly getting into a rhythm in your daily tasks helps build the discipline and endurance necessary to perform them effectively. It’s the same principle I’ve used in developing my Career Fitness regimen-a schedule of daily, weekly and monthly activities to build up the health of your career. It will be available soon in my forthcoming book, The Career Fitness Self Fulfillment System: How to Work Strong in Your Personal Pursuit of Happiness.

    The MarketingPilgrim.com, aka Andy Beal, correctly observes that it’s not enough for an organization to develop and publish an employment brand. The key is to success in the War for the Bet Talent is to manage that brand continuously. In other words, you want to know what people are saying about your organization’s employment brand-on blogs, in posts on site bulletin boards and in news articles and commentary-all of the time. How can you do that? Beal suggests that you subscribe to the services at either or both of the following:

  • Technorati.com, which will send you a notice by RSS feed any time a comment is posted on a blog about your company, its executives and/or products.
  • Google Alerts, which will send you an e-mail notice any time the search engine finds a match for your company’s name in its search results, news, blogs or groups.
  • I’ve used these features for several years now, and while they are helpful, they are also imperfect. Although I was looking for references to my company, for example, I’ve been alerted to more Weddles than I ever knew existed.

    Mercer HR Consulting released its 2007/8 U.S. Compensation Planning Survey. It found that employers plan to offer the following levels of pay raises to their employees in 2007:

  • For their highest performers, a raise in base pay of 5.7%;
  • For their average performers, a raise in base pay of 3.5%; and
  • For their weakest performers, a raise in base pay of 1.7%.
  • What does that mean for someone making $50,000 per annum? Superstars will get a raise of $2850, mediocre workers will get a raise of $1750, and substandard workers will receive a raise of $850. In other words, “A” level performers are going to get just $2000 more per year for their contribution than does a lousy employee and just $1100 more than the “C’ level performer. And employers wonder why their best and brightest are dissatisfied with their jobs. These pay policies aren’t recognition for top-flite performance; they’re a misguided social service program dressed up as strategic HR management.

    WEDDLE’s publications are the references of choice for recruiters seeking to maximize their return on the Internet and win the War for the Best Talent. They include:

  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guide to Employment Sites on the Internet. Called the “Zagat of the online employment industry” by the American Staffing Association, it provides full-page profiles of 350 of the best job boards in a range of occupations, industries and locations;
  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Directory of Employment Related Internet Sites. The “address book of the online employment industry,” it lists over 9,000 sites and organizes them by the occupational fields, industries and geographies on which they focus; and
  • WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guide to Association Web Sites. The key to the “hidden talent market” online, it details the recruiting resources and capabilities that are provided at the Web-sites of over 1,900 associations and societies.
  • Postcards from Space: Being the Best in Online Recruitment & HR Management. A compilation of Peter Weddle’s columns for The Wall Street Journal, it provides a complete introduction to the Best Practices for sourcing, recruiting and retaining talent online.
  • Generalship: HR Leadership in a Time of War. The only primer on leadership that focuses on the unique challenges of the HR professional waging both a War for Relevancy in the modern corporation and a War for Talent in the 21st Century labor market.
  • So make sure you’re at the top of your game, get your WEDDLE’s books today. Click on the appropriate link to your left or call WEDDLE’s at 317.598.9768.


    Section Three: Site Profiles

    Site Spotlite … from the pages of WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guides and Directories

    There are 40,000 job boards now in operation in North America and an equal number operating elsewhere around the world. The key to recruiting top talent online, therefore, is knowing where to find and how to select the best sites for each of your requirements. WEDDLE’s 2007/8 Guide identifies 350 of the top sites worldwide and provides the information you need to determine which job boards will deliver the optimum yield for you. For example:

    NationJob Network

    http://www.nationjob.com

    Post full time jobs: Yes

    Post part time, contract or consulting jobs: Yes-All

    Distribution of jobs: International

    Fee to post a job: $250/posting

    Posting period: 30 days

    Can posting be linked to your site: Yes

    Resume database: Yes

    Number of resumes: 650,000+

    Source of resumes: Direct from individual

    Top occupations among visitors: Engineering, Sales & Marketing, Medical, Entry level

    Other services for employers: Assessment instruments (outside vendor), Automated resume agent, Banner advertising, Status report on advertising.

    Member, International Association of Employment Web Sites: Yes


    Our Sponsor: WEDDLE’s 2007 Fall/Winter Training Se

    This issue of WEDDLE’s newsletter is brought to you through the generous support of the WEDDLE’s 2007 Fall/Winter Training Series.

    This series is a full curriculum of training programs that are delivered by toll-free teleconference. You get the PowerPoint slides for each program in advance, and on the day of the training, you simply call a toll-free number and have the presentation delivered right to you. All of the programs are presented by WEDDLE’s Publisher, Peter Weddle, and draw on WEDDLE’s 10+ years of research into the Best Practices for sourcing and recruiting online. The Fall/Winter 2007 series is sponsored by Bernard Hodes Group; the remaining programs include:

  • November 6, 2007: Googling, Blogging & Other Sourcing Techniques for Passive Prospects
  • November 27, 2007: Blink Recruiting-Getting to “Yes” Fast With Passive Prospects
  • December 4, 2007: Building a Corporate Career Site for Top Talent
  • December 18, 2007: A-to-Z in Best Practices for Online Recruitment Advertising
  • These are great learning opportunities and priced hundreds, even thousands of dollars less than other training programs. Registrations are limited, so reserve your seats now. To get pricing information and sign up, please call WEDDLE’s at 317.598.9768.